Citizen Science – One Square Metre

This campaign is totally inspired by Coca Cola. Last year I got a brief interview with a PR guy from the mega drinks company, he suggested that I was wrong when I said no matter where I went I always found a product made by the Coke corp on the beach. So I thought, how can we make a document of what is on the beaches for the TPP film, and thus this little bit of citizen science was born.

The idea is simple, draw a one metre squared area on the sand, I use a string to measure, but it is rough. Then pick out every bit of plastic within it, take a shot or log whats in it, and lets build up a database of what is most common out there from Coke caps to nurdles. So for the next three months we’re doing just that, and you can to if you want to be part of the film. We’re going to survey as many beaches as possible, to see what is the most common stuff turning up, then armed with the results I’m going to go and film some interviews with the companies involved. I’m not suggesting that it is their fault it reached the ocean, but pretty sure it will get them thinking about alternatives.

So todays are from Les Bourdaines and Le Penon in France, and are totally random, I’ll be cracking out a soil sieve as well at some point. Drop me a line if you fancy doing a couple over the winter, but remember there is gnarly stuff out there so wear gloves! Once it stops raining here, i’ll film the whole process as well.

The first one is Bourdaines here in Hossegor/Seignosse

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The Second Le Penon, and yes that is a Coke bottle top…

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Most common so far, other than nurdles and bits of polystyrene, Cotton Buds, they are everywhere, just don’t flush them people.

If you’d like to help us all we ask for is a quid/euro/dollar, no money goes towards surf trips or content creation, it all goes into distributing the images/film we take for free to schools, developing our schools projects and doing some film and slide evenings that’s it, we’re about education through surfing and like surfing we want to keep this organisation simple and to the point. (you can find out more about our educational programs HERE)

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What We Achieved in 2017

Rather than making sweeping revelations of change and resolutions for 2018, here s what we did in 2017

2017 Was a huge year for the plastic project. Not only did plastic enter the mainstream consciousness, but we got to play a big part in helping it get there.

So here are the highs  so you can all see exactly where the plastic project is at, plus the bits we have to step up on this year

Scotland from the water

As we have finished setting up our educational projects, it’s time to look forward to film and books, here’s a little glimpse of a few years shooting and filming in Scotland have delivered.

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If you’d like to help us all we ask for is a quid/euro/dollar, no money goes towards surf trips or content creation, it all goes into distributing the images/film we take for free to schools, developing our schools projects and doing some film and slide evenings that’s it, we’re about education through surfing and like surfing we want to keep this organisation simple and to the point. (you can find out more about our educational programs HERE)

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One Million Views

As you have seen we have been working with Lad Bible on their trash isles campaign, well the short film they made about us has had just over one million views. That’s pretty huge to help raise awareness and whilst we don’t have the budget, we have the impact of projects way over our size thanks to the amazing band of photogs, filmers and surfers on the ground everyday. If you’d like to be part of the trash isles campaign you can sign up here and check out the videos below.

Lad Bible Edit from The Plastic Project on Vimeo.

 

 

 

The Bay of Biscay is Sick

Golden dawns with the scent of pine in the air, and the noise of a fresh ground swell cracking across a shallow sandbar are what the French Atlantic is all about. But now, with every morning, as we slip into winter it is becoming more and more about rubbish. The high tide line is thick with large and micro versions of our plastic waste. Even with the relentless efforts of tractor crews, a fresh load is vomited onto the beach every morning. I wrote a little while ago the French coast was getting cleaner, I was wrong. There is everything from medical waste to single use creamer, Coke bottles to fishing gear, every object you can think of is washing up here, and the tide of crap is relentless.

 

The only answer is to stop this entering the sea, beachcleans are a short term fix/band aid, we have to cut the source and educate the whole planet as to what is going wrong.